Latest blog articles

Worksheet: Case for Change Management

While the data is quite clear that projects will be more successful if you apply change management, you may still find yourself working to justify change management to project team members and senior leaders in your organization. Below is a worksheet for making the case for change management by directly linking to the outcomes and objectives of the project you are supporting. Simply download the worksheet, fill in the blanks, and use this case with your project team, senior leader or whoever you are struggling to get resourcing and buy-in from. 

Begin with the End in Mind

Why do we do change management? To build excellent plans? To abide by best practices in business? To appease our leadership team that decided we needed it?

No. We apply change management because change management has a distinct and pointed focus on benefit realization and achieving the desired results and outcomes of change. When embarking on our change management journeys, we begin with the end in mind. The end, in the case of change management, is driving successful change. The means is applying a structured approach to helping individual employees adopt and proficiently use changes that impact them.

Connecting Change to Business Results: the 4 P's Exercise

How do you introduce change management to the stakeholders of a project you are supporting? Below is the Project-Purpose-Particulars-People exercise for helping an audience see the connection between change management and achieving business and project results.

The Case for Change Management Worksheet

Most of you are involved in projects that impact how people do their jobs. While the data is quite clear that your projects will be more successful if they apply change management, you may still find yourself working to justify change management to project team members and senior leaders in your organization.

How to Provide Context for Change Management

Many practitioners are faced with the challenge of building commitment and support for change management with their senior leaders and project teams. To gain the buy-in for change management that you need, you must present change management in the right context.

Creating a Compelling Business Case

The business case is more than just the numbers - it tells the story of your project. As you get ready to enter 2006, you will need to be able to make a compelling case - with both hard and soft 'Rs' - to get the funding and support you need for projects to be successful.

Change Management Myths

Prosci first released a tutorial on dispelling change management myths in March of 2006. Here, we bring back the myths from the original tutorial and add three additional myths that have emerged in recent years. Each of these myths represent a "change management" challenge for bringing change management into your organization. Some result from a lack of Awareness of the need for change management, while others stem from a lack of Knowledge about what change management really is. As you encounter the myths in your work, be sure you work to understand the root cause of the myth as well as the underlying drivers and concerns of your audience.

Cost Benefit Analysis of Change Management

This tutorial presents a cost-benefit analysis for investing in change management. It presents five perspectives on the "benefits" of applying change management on projects in the organization. Given the importance of change in today's environment, these approaches to making the case for change management can help ensure that change management is viewed as a "must have" and not a "nice to have" on the projects you support.

Subscribe to Our Blog!

Receive the latest Prosci thought leadership, how-to articles and industry news direct to your inbox.