Latest blog articles

Using the ADKAR Model to Create a Common Language for Change

When people do not share a common language, it can lead to confusing, even hilarious results. Consider the classic Abbott and Costello skit “Who’s On First,” where both comedians are saying the same words but meaning completely different things. While this conundrum makes  for great comedy, it can cause real problems in our organizations. And lack of a common language doesn’t just manifest in people assigning different meaning to the same word; it can also result in people using vastly different terms to describe the same thing. This can cause frustration, misunderstanding, and decreased efficiency as people decipher each other’s language.

Infographic: New Data on How the ADKAR Model Drives Change

Once people understand the Prosci ADKAR Model, they tend to fall in love. They shamelessly wear ADKAR glasses at conferences, start using ‘ADKAR’ as a verb (e.g., “I just ‘ADKAR-ed’ that senior leader big time!”) - and I’ve had more than one person threaten to get an ADKAR tattoo. Why are people so fanatical about the ADKAR Model? We set out to answer this question, and understand how change professionals are using it in new and unique ways, in the Applications of ADKAR research study. 

Change Is a Process

Change occurs as a process, not as an event. Organizational change does not happen instantaneously because there was an announcement, a kick-off meeting or even a go-live date. Individuals do not change simply because they received an email or attended a training program.

It takes more than building a beautiful ship

Changes ultimately come to life through the individuals who have to do their jobs differently as a result of a project or initiative. Whether the project involves a process impacting 15 people, a new technology impacting 150 or a transformation impacting 15,000, the success of the project is inextricably linked to the success of each of those individuals. Did they get on board, or did they stay on the shore?

The Common Denominator in Organizational Change

Each month, Prosci delivers over 30 Change Management Certification Programs. In order to participate, attendees must bring a change they are currently working on in their organization in order to apply the process and tools they will learn during the class to a real change.

Defining Success After Change Management Certification

I spend a significant portion of my time working with new change practitioners leaving Prosci’s Certification Program and supporting them on the first steps of their change management journey. The most common question I receive is “where do I start?” This question is the perfect segue into a conversation around the definition of success post-certification.

Unpacking the Prosci Methodology in the Practitioner eToolkit

‘Unpack’ is a word that entered our business vocabulary pretty recently and stuck. It refers to analyzing something by breaking it down into its component parts. Like, “let’s unpack this problem to decide the best approach forward,” or “if I unpack this concept, you will see the underlying logic.” Of course, the word ‘unpack’ can also mean opening and removing the contents from a suitcase or bag. If we think of the Practitioner eToolkit as a virtual change management tool bag, we can imagine opening it to see what it contains. 

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